Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 04 July 2013 12:27

Microsoft shows off touchy touch screen

Written by Nick Farrell

Touches you back

Microsoft have shown off a new touchscreen can provide ‘tactile feedback’ to users which can show how an object feels. Dubbed haptic technology it is hardware that takes advantage of the feeling of touch by offering feedback via pressure or vibration.

A Microsoft blog said that haptic technology does for the sense of touch what computer graphics does for vision. The touchscreen has a robotic arm to adjust how ‘hard’ different surfaces feel to the user. When a person touches one of the objects displayed the screen responds, tracking what the user is touching and pushing back against them. A force-feedback monitor responds to convey the sensation of different material.

“The stone block “feels” hard to the touch and requires more force to push, while the sponge block is soft and easy to push," the Redmond blog said.

When the returned pressure is combined with more standard 3D screen technology, that tracks the user and adjusts at what angle and size the object is displayed on screen to give the illusion of depth. This makes it possible for your brain to accept the virtual world as real.

It appears to be just the technology the porn industry has been waiting for, but Microsoft seems to think its killer app will be the medical industry.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments